What to see?

City walls

City walls

Without doubt, one of the main attractions of old Dubrovnik is the city walls and no visitor should leave without arranging a guided walk around the top. The walls are up to six metres thick in some places and have served to protect Dubrovnik since the middle ages.

Stradun

Stradun (Placa)

The Stradun, or Placa, is Dubrovnik’s main street, stretching from the Pile Gate through the old quarter to the Ploce Gate. Visitors to the city can spend hours strolling along its limestone pavements, lined with shops, restaurants and many of Croatia’s most impressive monuments.

Dominican monastery

Dominican monastery

The fortress-like Dominican monastery in Dubrovnik holds a wealth of history as well as rich collection of valuable art including paintings by Dubrovnik’s greatest painters and artefacts of gold exhibited in the museum.

Old port

Old port

Once the main trading and maritime hub, today the old port is a picturesque part of Dubrovnik and aquatic gateway for island exploration and coastal excursions. The protective fortresses of St. Luke, St. John and Revelin still stand guard as they have done for many centuries.

Orlando

Orlando’s column

Located between the Sponza Palace and the Church of St. Blaise, the stone Orlando’s Column stands as a symbol of Dubrovnik’s freedom. The raising of the ‘Libertas’ flag on the column marks the start of the annual Dubrovnik Summer Festival.

Rector's Palace

Rector’s Palace

The Rector’s Palace is one of the most important landmarks of Dubrovnik and served as head office for the Ragusa government as well as housing a dungeon and providing residence for the rector. Nowadays, this magnificent Croatian mansion displays museum exhibits upstairs and hosts classical music concerts in the courtyard during Dubrovnik’s Summer Festival.

Sponza Palace

Sponza Palace

Amongst Dubrovnik’s many attractions, the Sponza Palace will have particular appeal to visitors interested in Croatia’s history. Built in 1520, this Gothic/Renaissance palace used to be the customs house and is now the state archive containing documents and photos of Dubrovnik’s turbulent past. Art exhibitions and concerts are often held in the palace courtyard.

St. Blaise church

St. Blaise church

The patron saint of Dubrovnik. This majestic church is dedicated to the patron saint of Dubrovnik who was said to have protected the city from Venetian attacks in 971 AD. Built by the Venetian architect and sculptor M. Gropelli at the beginning of the 18th century, it lies on the Stradun at the heart of the city.

Dubrovnik cathedral

Dubrovnik cathedral

The original church was built between the 12th and 14th centuries on the ruins of a 7th century Byzantine basilica, financed according to legend by Richard the Lionheart who was once shipwrecked in Dubrovnik. After the 1667 earthquake, Dubrovnik Cathedral was reconstructed in Baroque style and is now a popular attraction for the city’s many visitors.

Franciscan Monastery of the Friars Minor

Franciscan Monastery of the Friars Minor

Built in 1317 under the city ramparts, the Franciscan Monastery of the Friars Minor provides an enthralling glimpse into Dubrovnik’s religion and history. One of its attractions, a small apothecary within, claims to be the oldest working pharmacy in Europe and features a fascinating array of ancient laboratory equipment.